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Ancestral Trails 2016 » HAMON DENTATUS DE CREVEQUER (1002-????)

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Gezin van HAMON DENTATUS DE CREVEQUER

Hij heeft/had een relatie met GODEHILDE DE BELLEME.


Kind(eren):

  1. HAMON DAPIFER DE CREVEQUER  1030-1100 


Notities over HAMON DENTATUS DE CREVEQUER

Hamon Dentatus (d. circa 1047) was a Norman noble who held the lordship of Torigny-sur-Vire, Manche, in Normandy. Hamon Dentatus rebelled against Duke William, later William the Conqueror, and died in about 1047. His Latin epithet Dentatus signifies "betoothed" or "toothy". Little is known about his life other than his progeny.

The origins of Hamon Dentatus are unknown, although various suggestions have been made. Rev. Roger Granville in his 1895 work History of the Granville Family stated without any source or rationale being given, that he was a younger son of Mauger, jure uxoris Count of Corbeil, himself a younger son of Richard Sans Peur, Duke of Normandy, grandson of Rollo. This pedigree appeared to Round to have been "hatched in the seventeenth century" (by the Granville family) "...wishing to exalt Hamon Dentatus" (of whom they claimed to be heirs male and heirs to the supposed Norman "Earldom of Corbeil").

He is supposed to have held the titles "Count/Earl of Corboile/Corboyle/Corbeuil", and "Lord of Thorigny and Granville", all in Normandy. These titles were confirmed retroactively by King Charles II in 1661 in his royal warrant which elevated to the peerage John Granville, 1st Earl of Bath (1628-1701), of Stowe, Kilkhampton.

The text of the warrant is as follows:
"Whereas it appears unto us that our right trusty and right well-beloved cousin John, Earl of Bath, Our Grome of the Stole and First Gentleman of our Bedchamber, derives his title in a direct line as heir male unto Robert FitzHamon, Lord of Gloucester and Glamorgan in the reignes of King William the Conqueror, King William Rufus and King Henry the First, and who was the son and heir of the Lord Hamon dentatus, Earle of Corboile and Lord of Thorigny and Granville in Normandy, whereby he justly claims his descent from the younger son, as we ourself do from the eldest, of Rollo the first Duke of Normandy our com'on ancestor. In consideration whereof...we are graciously pleased to promise and declare that in case the Earldom of Glamorgan should at any time fall into the hands of the Crown during our reigne...we will not again confer the said earldom upon any other family but restore (sic) the same to that of the Granvilles by creating the said present Earl of Bath also Earl of Glamorgan...and we are further graciously pleased for the considerations aforesaid to allow and permit the said Earl of Bath to use also these other titles of honour as Earls of Corboile, Thorigny and Granville, as was formerly done by his ancestors and though the same has been discontinued of late by some of his said ancestors yet we do hereby give full power and authority to the said Earl of Bath, not only for himself and his posterity to use the same, but in case he shall hereafter erect in memory of his father or any other his former ancestors any monument or inscription concerning him or them, to use the name stile and dignity of Earle of Corboile, Thorigny and Granville, in as full and ample a manner as his said ancestors formerly and before Normandy was lost from the Crown of England, the said family of Granville being then also sufferers with the Crown and then also dispossessed for their loyalty out of their said inheritance of the said Earldom and Lordships within the said Dutchy of Normandy".

He left progeny including:
Hamo Dapifer (died circa 1100) (alias Haimo) an Anglo-Norman royal official under both King William the Conqueror (1066-1087) and his son King William Rufus (1087-1100). He held the office, from which his epithet derives, known in Latin as dapifer and in French seneschal, in English "steward", as well as the office of Sheriff of Kent. He was the father of Robert FitzHamon (d.1107), the conqueror of Glamorgan.

Grenville legend
By the 17th century, the Grenville/Granville family of Stowe in the parish of Kilkhampton in Cornwall and of Bideford in Devon would develop pedigrees claiming descent from a supposed brother of Robert Fitzhamon, who was then made son of Hamon Dentatus. This was despite William of Malmesbury having described Hamo Dentatus as avus ("grandfather") to Robert Fitzhamon. Rev. Roger Granville in his 1895 work History of the Granville Family stated without any source or rationale being given, that Hamon was a younger son of Mauger, jure uxoris Count of Corbeil, himself a younger son of Richard, Duke of Normandy, grandson of Rollo. This pedigree appeared to Round to have been "hatched in the seventeenth century" (by the Granville family) "...wishing to exalt Hamon Dentatus." The erroneous descent was given official status when recited in the royal warrant signed in 1661 by King Charles II creating titles of nobility for John Granville, 1st Earl of Bath (1628-1701). An imaginary depiction of Hamon Dentatus, together with many other supposed and actual Granville family ancestors, is shown in a series of two stained glass windows erected in 1860 in the Granville Chapel in the Church of St James the Great, Kilkhampton, Cornwall, in which parish was situated the Grenville seat of Stowe.
SOURCE: Wikipedia - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hamon_Dentatus

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De publicatie Ancestral Trails 2016 is samengesteld door (neem contact op).
Wilt u bij het overnemen van gegevens uit deze stamboom alstublieft een verwijzing naar de herkomst opnemen:
Patti Lee Salter, "Ancestral Trails 2016", database, Genealogie Online (https://www.genealogieonline.nl/ancestral-trails-2016/I114331.php : benaderd 23 september 2021), "HAMON DENTATUS DE CREVEQUER (1002-????)".